12:17 pm - Mon, Jan 13, 2014

Del Posto - NYC - Phin’s Review

11:43 am
Phin Upham Review: Del Posto
Location: New York City 
Rating: 9/10
Check out Phin Upham’s video review of Del Posto - just posted! 

Phin Upham Review: Del Posto

Location: New York City 

Rating: 9/10

Check out Phin Upham’s video review of Del Posto - just posted! 

6:32 pm - Mon, Jan 6, 2014
1:42 pm - Thu, Jan 2, 2014
Alexander’s Steakhouse - San Francisco 448 Brannan Street San Francisco, CA 94107
Best steak in the Bay Area. The atmosphere is upscale yet casual. No steakhouse stuffiness or jackets required here. Start with the hamachi shooters, then head straight for the prime rib or tomahawk cut. Can’t go wrong with either choice. The wine list is ample with a mixture of reasonable reds, and there are definitely some special occasion options if you’re in a celebratory mood.
See my video review here - Phin Upham Review - Alexander’s Steakhouse

Alexander’s Steakhouse - San Francisco
448 Brannan Street
San Francisco, CA 94107

Best steak in the Bay Area. The atmosphere is upscale yet casual. No steakhouse stuffiness or jackets required here. Start with the hamachi shooters, then head straight for the prime rib or tomahawk cut. Can’t go wrong with either choice. The wine list is ample with a mixture of reasonable reds, and there are definitely some special occasion options if you’re in a celebratory mood.

See my video review here - Phin Upham Review - Alexander’s Steakhouse

1:01 pm - Thu, May 3, 2012
931 notes

experimentsinmotion:

Ferrofluids are liquids which becomes strongly polarized in the presence of a magnetic field.

5:13 pm - Tue, Apr 17, 2012
12 notes

thenationmagazine:

For a man whose presidential campaign is based almost exclusively on his economic knowledge and experience, Mitt Romney is having an awfully hard time figuring out how to make this budget of his add up. Ben Adler reports:

Publicly, Romney has proposed to make the Bush tax cuts permanent…

10:25 am - Tue, Apr 10, 2012
116 notes

think-progress:

Following the lead of Kraft, Pepsi, Coca-Cola, and Intuit.

3:20 pm - Mon, Apr 2, 2012
198 notes
theatlantic:

Austerity Is a Disaster: The Lesson of Europe’s Record Unemployment

Euro zone unemployment just hit a 15-year high. German unemployment just hit a 15-year low. What can those of us across the Atlantic glean from this seemingly bipolar state of affairs? That austerity, every economic conservative’s favorite prescription for an ailing economy — the medicine Republicans here in the United States are pushing hard — is an utter disaster. 
A few euro zone members, including Germany and the Netherlands, are enjoying a relative jobs boom. And yet, europe’s overall unemployment rate is 10.8 percent. How is this possible? Because of  depression-level unemployment in Europe’s austerity-plagued periphery. […]
This should put to rest the notion of “expansionary austerity” — that is, that budget cuts can spur growth by giving businesses increased confidence. It has been an epic, epic failure with interest rates at zero. The more a country has cut, the more unemployment it has. Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland have all had markets (and Germany) force them to radically reduce deficits amidst already deep slumps. The result has been even deeper slumps. Joblessness has jumped to levels not seen in advanced countries since the 1930s.
Read more. [Image: Eurostat]

theatlantic:

Austerity Is a Disaster: The Lesson of Europe’s Record Unemployment

Euro zone unemployment just hit a 15-year high. German unemployment just hit a 15-year low. What can those of us across the Atlantic glean from this seemingly bipolar state of affairs? That austerity, every economic conservative’s favorite prescription for an ailing economy — the medicine Republicans here in the United States are pushing hard — is an utter disaster. 

A few euro zone members, including Germany and the Netherlands, are enjoying a relative jobs boom. And yet, europe’s overall unemployment rate is 10.8 percent. How is this possible? Because of  depression-level unemployment in Europe’s austerity-plagued periphery. […]

This should put to rest the notion of “expansionary austerity” — that is, that budget cuts can spur growth by giving businesses increased confidence. It has been an epic, epic failure with interest rates at zero. The more a country has cut, the more unemployment it has. Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland have all had markets (and Germany) force them to radically reduce deficits amidst already deep slumps. The result has been even deeper slumps. Joblessness has jumped to levels not seen in advanced countries since the 1930s.

Read more. [Image: Eurostat]

3:19 pm
9 notes

yahoopolitics:

The Supreme Court appeared sharply divided Wednesday over whether they would have to kill President Obama’s landmark health care overhaul outright if they decree that the measure requiring individuals to have insurance or pay a penalty is unconstitutional.

If the so-called individual mandate is…

10:27 am - Thu, Mar 15, 2012
90 notes
vicemag:

Our Economic Recovery
If you believe what you read in the papers, we are in the midst of a genuine, bona fide economic recovery. You can tell because the bad numbers are smaller and the good numbers are bigger. The unemployment rate has stabilized at 8.3 percent, we’ve added a little over two million jobs to the national payroll over the past six months, and the stock market’s up. It’s morning in America, everyone!
Journalists started talking like this during last week’s news cycle. Every show and newspaper featured at least one story about the numbers getting better, usually capped with some economist cautioning, with a carefully vacuous caveat, that “This number is good. But there are also other numbers. In the future, there may be more numbers.” Seriousness!
Some politicians are eagerly presenting the latest figures as evidence that we’re all going to be OK. But we’re not. Even Americans with jobs are lacking basic financial security, earning wages that are actually shrinking when adjusted for inflation.
The unemployment rate is also blind to underemployment. A 20-hour-a-week gig at a Sears cash register makes you “employed,” whether you’re a high school student, a 57-year-old telephone lineman, or a law school graduate. The term is “employed,” not “gainfully employed.” You can be hustling backwards working three part-time jobs or you can be crushed under debt, you can be literally dying of a chronic illness you can’t afford to treat, but you’re still just “employed” to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Bureau measures whether you’re in the employment pool. It doesn’t measure whether you’re drowning.
Continue

vicemag:

Our Economic Recovery

If you believe what you read in the papers, we are in the midst of a genuine, bona fide economic recovery. You can tell because the bad numbers are smaller and the good numbers are bigger. The unemployment rate has stabilized at 8.3 percent, we’ve added a little over two million jobs to the national payroll over the past six months, and the stock market’s up. It’s morning in America, everyone!

Journalists started talking like this during last week’s news cycle. Every show and newspaper featured at least one story about the numbers getting better, usually capped with some economist cautioning, with a carefully vacuous caveat, that “This number is good. But there are also other numbers. In the future, there may be more numbers.” Seriousness!

Some politicians are eagerly presenting the latest figures as evidence that we’re all going to be OK. But we’re not. Even Americans with jobs are lacking basic financial security, earning wages that are actually shrinking when adjusted for inflation.

The unemployment rate is also blind to underemployment. A 20-hour-a-week gig at a Sears cash register makes you “employed,” whether you’re a high school student, a 57-year-old telephone lineman, or a law school graduate. The term is “employed,” not “gainfully employed.” You can be hustling backwards working three part-time jobs or you can be crushed under debt, you can be literally dying of a chronic illness you can’t afford to treat, but you’re still just “employed” to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Bureau measures whether you’re in the employment pool. It doesn’t measure whether you’re drowning.

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